[Mansa-l] Genre, souffrance, mariage / Gender, suffering, marriage (Re: Appel à Contributions / Call for Papers, ASA 2018)

graeme at radioafrica.com.au graeme at radioafrica.com.au
Thu Mar 1 23:43:17 CST 2018


Yes, excellent kamalengoni playing by Alou Fané, who made some wonderful early recordings of that style with Daouda “Flani” Sangaré, of the Super Djata Band. Alou was a member of the National Ballet.

 

Alou Fané & Daouda Sangaré

     1982   Kamelen n’gonin. Disco Club de la Bagoué. FT 001. 33.3 rpm disc. 

     1983   Rythmes du Wassoulou. Vol 2. Ivoire Polydisc. IP 8301. 33.3 rpm disc.

     1983   Rythmes du Wassoulou. Vol 2. Ivoire Polydisc. IP 8302. 33.3 rpm disc. (Re-issue of  Disco Club de la Bagoué. FT 001)

 

A video of them together is at https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DAGTh3Fa5zoM&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636555662320212797&sdata=t2UEgwVnZ3AnbU1ISbfD7Yz6if8lQ7F0Y%2BrlVKlb9xE%3D&reserved=0

 

From: Lucy Duran [mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk] 
Sent: Monday, February 5, 2018 05:41
To: Bruce Whitehouse <brw208 at lehigh.edu>
Cc: Mansa-List <mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu>
Subject: Re: [Mansa-l] Genre, souffrance, mariage / Gender, suffering, marriage (Re: Appel à Contributions / Call for Papers, ASA 2018)

 

SEE DESCRIPTION OF THE SONG 'MOUGNA' BY SALI SIDIBE ON BACK OF VINYL ALBUM 'SALI SIDIBE, L'ENFANT CHERI DU WASSOLON' -  PROBABLY DATING FROM THE LATE 1980s

Quite pertinent to this discussion, isn't it? Mande song always provides such brilliant insight into gender issues. 

And you can listen to what she sings about here: it's the first track on this youtube link. Of course, it's the well-trodden trope of how the polygynous husband always prefers the new wife. Some wonderful kamalengoni playing 
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DlGaWJY7u8Sc&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636555662320212797&sdata=tlhid7i3lq5n%2F3cZJkKBR%2Fq1zVnGTKEhtAgpGSRr4Vo%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DlGaWJY7u8Sc&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=3no%2BHo2l0T%2BOyNRFWdI3PCp8bVRuUro21gIHrjemQGI%3D&reserved=0> 



 

On 3 February 2018 at 16:30, Bruce Whitehouse <brw208 at lehigh.edu <mailto:brw208 at lehigh.edu> > wrote:

Very interesting! Some participants on the research_africa list are dubious that muñ / munyu applies any differently to women than it does to men; they are speaking mainly from experience in Senegal (Wolof and Sereer). Which raises an important question: Would it be plausible to suppose that Malians associate munyu more with women/wives than with men/husbands? 

Bruce

 

On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 11:03 AM, Mohomodou Houssouba <mh at bollag-areal.ch <mailto:mh at bollag-areal.ch> > wrote:

Dear Bruce and Valentin,

 

It has been an instructive exchange indeed. Thank you for the other contributions to the debate. I tried to find out more about the Arabic connection. So far, nothing conclusive Yesterday I called back a person who is a learned scholar in the old school of Songhay-Arabic exegesis. Last September-October, when I returned to Gao, I brought along Prost’s « La langue soṅay et ses dialectes » (IFAN, 1956) and he helped review many of the Arabic annotations. 

 

He had had two days to think about it but couldn’t find any problem. Interestingly, the Songhay-language teacher herself was convinced it was a “pure” Songhay word, and a Fulfulde speaker was certain the word « muñde » is an authentic Fula word, as far as he is concerned. So far so good, one can say!  Ce qui ne confirme, ni n’infirme…   

 

Morphologically, Gomez’ suggestion leaves me rather intrigued, if not puzzled. 

 

Lastly, I am only giving what I know or can guess about the meanings and connotations in the Songhay speeches. So the gender aspect may be salient or relevant in other sociocultural and linguistic contexts. I don’t think it will be the case where I am looking up close. Actually I browsed through the New Testament in Songhay, I realize that the religious connotation is indeed very strong. « Muɲe » recurs and is in many ways related to forbearance, but even more to forms of piety or pious patience and acceptance of discomfort, displeasure, disappointment, or affliction. In this case, a somewhat mystic worldview in which inner strength and personal determination can stand up to physical or psychological suffering « subur nda muɲe » is nearly tautological.  

 

Mohomodou


——————————

Mohomodou Houssouba

10e Conférences MSAS  

Bamako | 29 juillet – 3 août 2018

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.msas.ml&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=M5OeHZOdrjIcrMEsyiRpUcKiD3i2L6102d2KciljDkA%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.msas.ml&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cf619396419fb44d6b3ae08d56b237d80%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636532722571909644&sdata=aO25pwbr4cy0SXkJJ%2FrpEO%2FVy98tgiYNvWgNeBgVvXE%3D&reserved=0> 

— 

 

Am 01.02.2018 um 12:53 schrieb Bruce Whitehouse <brw208 at lehigh.edu <mailto:brw208 at lehigh.edu> >:





Many thanks to Mohomodou and Valentin for these valuable contributions. A parallel discussion of this topic has been taking place on another list (research_africa at duke.edu <mailto:research_africa at duke.edu> ), from which I would like to share a few highlights. A number of scholars have volunteered similar terms in Hausa and Yoruba. On the question of linguistic origins, Michael Gomez asked: "Might these terms be cognates of the Arabic anāh/ṭūl al-anāh?" 

Another part of the conversation questions the extent to which we should think of words like muñ and munyu as having some special meaning for women. Ibra Sene wrote: 

I think that understanding "muñ" (Seereer and Wolof) only as the "expectation" for women to "be patient and tolerant of suffering, particularly within the framework of marriage" would be a very reductionist translation that does not take into account the polysemic nature of this term in these two languages. It could also mean patience, resolve, calm, or perseverance. Another thing is that, given the many contexts within which the term is often used, suggesting that it designates "gendered roles" would be a bit problematic.


Fallou Ngom referred us to his 2016 book Muslims Beyond the Arab World: The Odyssey of Ajami and the Muridiyya, in which I found the following passage (p. 116):

The widespread belief in the virtue of bearing suffering courageously, whether manmade or fated, is embodied in the Wolof saying “ku muñ muuñ” (one who perseveres in the face of suffering will smile). Cheikh Hamidou Kane’s popular novel set in the colonial encounter between French and West African cultures, Ambiguous Adventure, illustrates the virtues of suffering in the education of children among the Fulani people. <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oxfordscholarship.com%2Fview%2F10.1093%2Facprof%3Aoso%2F9780190279868.001.0001%2Facprof-9780190279868-chapter-4%3Frskey%3D5EwZEi%26result%3D1%23acprof-9780190279868-miscMatter-13-note-363&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cd97e6ca3ee5b4927616708d5696a707e%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636530828267510026&sdata=%2B%2Fw%2BOi1aTjKCIDiJM8cLTj2DmK%2BN1JvQlooeX1vQLNg%3D&reserved=0> 2 Babou notes that suffering has been part of the means through which traditional Qurʾānic and Ṣūfī schools in West Africa mold the character of their students to give them religious education and train them to cope with and overcome hardships.


A little later in the same chapter (p. 129) Ngom writes: 

The value attached to suffering permeates all layers of the Wolof social hierarchy and across genders. While a mother is the path to a successful life for her offspring, her own success to have blessed offspring depends on the amount of suffering she endures bravely and the virtuous conduct she demonstrates at home to earn her husband’s ngërëm (endorsement). The popular saying liggéeyu ndey añub doom (the work of a mother is the lunch of her offspring) conveys the idea that one’s failure or success is largely credited to the work of one’s mother. It is particularly for this reason that Bamba’s mother, Maam Jaara, is hailed across Murīd sources (and by Murīd women) and it is why the ʿAjamī poet, Muusaa Ka, gives her credit for her son’s achievements. The poem in which Ka listed the 626 prominent leaders that Bamba mended and elevated to the rank of Shaykh (discussed in chapter <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oxfordscholarship.com%2Fview%2F10.1093%2Facprof%3Aoso%2F9780190279868.001.0001%2Facprof-9780190279868-chapter-3%23&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cd97e6ca3ee5b4927616708d5696a707e%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636530828267510026&sdata=HYoYS4mNFGpkWiiZi6RWFcnABEr5cMWD1t3JXn%2BolRE%3D&reserved=0>  2) is named Jaaraama Maam Jaara (Tribute to Maam Jaara) to give credit and honor to his mother, as is customary in Wolof society. <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oxfordscholarship.com%2Fview%2F10.1093%2Facprof%3Aoso%2F9780190279868.001.0001%2Facprof-9780190279868-chapter-4%3Frskey%3DlsKWw6%26result%3D2%23acprof-9780190279868-miscMatter-13-note-400&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cd97e6ca3ee5b4927616708d5696a707e%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636530828267510026&sdata=%2Buvfs0uAV7riBe0pln7fdtCb9AtGzLkkCzXSh6QM0WQ%3D&reserved=0> 39

 

The story in which Bamba’s mother spent the night holding a fence in pouring rain because her husband had asked her for help and later forgot, and fell asleep, is much praised in Murīd sources and has spawned devotional visual images. She is portrayed as the role model for Murīd women. Her story, just like that of her son, is a classical Murīd suffering-based success story. The hardship she sustained, the virtue she epitomized, and the remarkable son she brought to the world are entwined in Murīd narratives.

 

This is as much as I could find in Ngom's book about gender, but I need to spend more time with it.

Bruce

 

 

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 3:29 AM, Valentin Vydrin <vydrine at gmail.com <mailto:vydrine at gmail.com> > wrote:

Mohomodou, thank you for your very interesting and exhaustive survey!

 

To my mind, the Hombori form mú:ɲê meaning 'have a desire for' (if it turns out that the form mú:ɲê is morphologically related to mùɲè ~ mùɲà) is a good evidence for the Arabic origin of this root (both in the Hombori Songhay, or may be even elsewhere). However, it is yet to be proved that the morphological relation exists. It is also not excluded that both forms (mú:ɲê and mùɲè result from independent borrowing (we all know that such double borrowings from the same source are not rare, cf. in Bambara: káyira 'peace, happiness' and hɛ́ɛrɛ 'peace, happiness, joy' coming back to the same Arabic khayr 'blessing, good').

 

The most plusible scenarium seems to me 1) a borrowing Arabic muniy to Soninke; 2) borrowing of the Soninke form (originating from Arabic) to all other languages of the region.

However, a parallel direct borrowing from Arabic to individual languages is possible also (which may result in "etymological doublets" diverging in form and meaning, as in the Hombori Songhay).

 

Best,

 

Valentin Vydrin

 

 

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 11:15 PM, Mohomodou Houssouba <mh at bollag-areal.ch <mailto:mh at bollag-areal.ch> > wrote:

I have checked several Songhay lexicons. The etymological question remains open, so for now, just a couple of examples.

 

Jeffrey Heath’s 3 dialectal dictionaries (1998): 

Djenne: « muñɛ » [with annotation Ful. be patient, wait / patienter * wait for / attendre]

 

Timbuktu: [« muñe » (tolerate, put up with * supporter / tolérer * wait for /attendre √ Ful.]

 

But no entry for the more voluminous dictionary dedicated to the Gao idiom. 

 

The more recent online publication (2015) on the Hombori idiom features these entries:

—-

mùɲè  ~  mùɲà  ~  mùŋè  £ a) [intr] be patient, wait; be tolerant ] patienter, attendre; ê. tolérant [TSK mùyⁿá ; perhaps <Ful √muɲ‑]  £ b) [tr] wait patiently for (sth) ] attendre (qqch) avec patience - Recip: cèr ­múɲè  be tolerant of each other ² ê. mutuellement tolérant.

mú:ɲê  £ [VO] have a desire for, feel like ] avoir envie de [3SgO mú:ɲ‑à ; [perhaps <Ful √muuy‑] - ex: ì mú:ɲé ꜜdór‑ó hàŋ‑ɲòŋ  I felt like drinking millet beer ² j’ai eu envie de boire la bière de mil.

—-

I checked André Prost’s 1956 dictionary which has good annotations in Arabic script for words borrowed from Arabic. No entry there. 

 

Youssouf Haïdara et al.’s 2010 two-volume dictionary. The « soŋay-français » volume has only an entry for « muray », semantically close to « muɲe » in Gao. 

 

I had a call with Youssouf and he wasn’t sure about an Arabic origin. He called me back after consulting a Songhay-speaking Arabic teacher. That one either couldn’t make a connection. So if you take the expression « subur nda muɲe » (Timbuktu) / « suuri nda muɲe » (Gao), the s-(b)-r word is originally Arabic, the m-ny one doesn’t seem to cohere (phonologically). The Arabic specialist asked to look toward Soninke. Apparently, there is an ancient stock of borrowings from Soninke into Songhay. As well as an important presence of Fula(n) (Fulfulde) words.

 

I talked with someone in Gao to check if « suuri nda © is actually current in Gao, and she was surprised that I asked this. I told her that I didn’t find « muɲe » in the dictionaries based on the Gao idiom. There is no form of it in the modest Zarma dictionary I have either. Affaire à suivre…

 

Precision: The gendered connotation of « muɲe » in the sŋ examples would be somewhat tenuous. « Muɲe » can be seen as part of a semantic spectrum:

(ka) muray: (to) ignore, neglect; also, possibly to do or commit something on purpose

(ka) muɲe: (to) endure patiently, close the eyes on someone else’s faults, to tolerate, to endure (in the sense of showing a pious disposition)

(ka) subur / suburi / suuri: (to) be patient; better yet en français: « patienter »

 

Mélomane’s tip: The expression “subur nda muɲe » can be heard as recurrent motif in the song « Soubour » of the Songhoy Blues band.

 

Mohomodou 

—

PS. The characters « ñ » and « ɛ » do not figure in the official Songhay alphabet in Mali. There are « ɲ » and « e » (e possible with the tilde for nasalization, but in theory this applies to all vowels: though mostly used with /a/ and /o/ (ã/õ), more as variants.


——————————

 

Am 31.01.2018 um 19:28 schrieb Coleman Donaldson <colemandonaldson at gmail.com <mailto:colemandonaldson at gmail.com> >:





Lon ka jan, à sebali tè!

 

Wish I had more to contribute - hope to hear others chime in. Particularly curious if Mooré has a cognate term or usage. 

 

Coleman

 

On Jan 31, 2018 18:02, "Bruce Whitehouse" <brw208 at lehigh.edu <mailto:brw208 at lehigh.edu> > wrote:

Are you volunteering for that job, Coleman? :)

 

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 12:01 PM, Coleman Donaldson <colemandonaldson at gmail.com <mailto:colemandonaldson at gmail.com> > wrote:

Bien dit, karamògò Keïta.

 

What makes this interesting to me is Cherif's remarks coupled with the initial suggestions that it is likely a concept with linguistic (in form and meaning) cognates across diverse West African populations that speak typologically distinct languages that stretch far behind Manding varieties. In this sense, it could be a term that begs a socio-historic account of its regional propagation that would track its emergence as well as semantic and indexical shifts both within and beyond ethnicity.

 

I eagerly await the answer from the panelists :-)

 

Hakèto b'a la!

 

Coleman

 

 

On Jan 31, 2018 17:28, "Bruce Whitehouse" <brw208 at lehigh.edu <mailto:brw208 at lehigh.edu> > wrote:

Cherif, I'm curious to what extent munyu is a gendered virtue in Mande societies. In my interviews with Malians I tend to hear them associate associate it with being a wife (along with sabali, "patience") but not with being a husband. Are men also expected to exercise munyu and if so, would they exercise it differently than women do?

Bruce

 

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 11:21 AM, Cherif Keita <ckeita at carleton.edu <mailto:ckeita at carleton.edu> > wrote:

"Munyu" seems to be linked to the notion of tolerating a co-wife and sharing the space(and the man!) with another woman, often called ironically, "younger sister".

It is also linked to the ability of a woman to engender(wòlò) a strong child, an ambitious and courageous one, monè bò den. It is as if all the anger countenanced by a woman is destined to be channeled through that child, whose heroic actions, will give the mother her ultimate social consecration.

"Munyu" is a rich Mande concept, that goes far beyond its initial Arabic understanding. It is one of the foundations of "mogoya", the ideal of personhood(both men and women).

Keep well, 

 

On Wed, Jan 31, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Julie Moore <juliemooresc at gmail.com <mailto:juliemooresc at gmail.com> > wrote:

This thread is fascinating. Especially as the relinquishing or postponement of one's desires is what can enable one to have that stoic patience/ acceptance of suffering. These qualities, it seems to me, are the forgotten face of feminism. It is often the Western viewpoint that rejecting the suffering to pursue one's goals is what makes one a feminist, whereas in more traditional situations the ability to bear the difficulties of Womanhood is what makes a woman strong.

-Julie Moore

Cradleofjazz.org <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2FCradleofjazz.org&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cefc494cee6e74b00112008d568f81acc%7Cf6906d44b5cf48ad98a9027f2e150263%7C0%7C1%7C636530337221020568&sdata=9W2%2FgDlOo8XSuNnFu%2Fbpz2bWpHZuR%2FnV4OGrQKWGn6o%3D&reserved=0> 

Adjunct, World Music, Furman U.

 

On Jan 29, 2018 3:20 PM, "Valentin Vydrin" <vydrine at gmail.com <mailto:vydrine at gmail.com> > wrote:

The existence of this stem in numerous languages may be indicative of different things. In principle, it may be a common stem inherited by daughter languages from the mother language; otherwise, it could be a borrowing. This stem appears in both Mande and Atlantic languages; therefore, it could be either a Mande borrowing to Atlantic languages, or vice-versa. Or yet, it could have been borrowed from Arabic to all these languages.

Yet another option could be, for example: first, Soninke borrowed this stem from Arabic; second, other languages of the region borrowed it from Soninke (which was the predominant language in West Sudan during the supremacy of the Ancient Ghana, and even afterwards).

 

Best,

 

Valentin

 

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 9:01 PM, Lucy Duran <ld at soas.ac.uk <mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk> > wrote:

Well your definitions of the Arabic term would certainly support your theory... I'm not a linguist but surely the occurrence of this same root across so many different languages is also an indicator of a borrowing? 

 

On 29 January 2018 at 19:47, Valentin Vydrin <vydrine at gmail.com <mailto:vydrine at gmail.com> > wrote:

Lucy, firstly, I don't insist on the hypothesis of the Arabic origin of this stem in Mande and Atlantic languages; it is just one hypothesis amony others.

Secondly, the semantic similarity grows more evident if we consider other meanings expressed by the same Arabic root. The verb mana: means 'to test someone (for endurance)', and the passive form, muniya, means 'suffer a defeat; endure (a loss)'. This sounds much closer to the Mande/Atlantic words we are discussing...

 

Valentin

 

 

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 8:37 PM, Lucy Duran <ld at soas.ac.uk <mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk> > wrote:

Valentin, the idea that ka munya (the Mandinka form of the verb) is related to an Arabic word meaning desire is quite fascinating; but how could such a metamorphosis of meaning from endurance to desire come about?  
I have written (reference cited below) about the strikingly parallel use of the term in the discourse of both hunters and women, and commented on the interesting gender implications; it seems endurance and stoicism are qualities that are requisite to be both a good hunter and a good woman/wife/mother. 

Best, Lucy

Durean, Lucy. 2000  "Women, music, and the mystique of hunters in Mali", in Ingrid Monson (ed), The African Diaspora: a musical perspective. Garland: New York, 137-86

 

 

On 29 January 2018 at 18:09, Valentin Vydrin <vydrine at gmail.com <mailto:vydrine at gmail.com> > wrote:

Here are some more forms:

 

Xasonka: mùɲa vi be patient; vt bear, endure

Maninka (Guinea): mùɲun

Soninke: muɲu patience, endurance, muɲi vt endure, cope with; vi wait patiently

Bozo-Sorogama: muɲu vi wait; n waiting; patience

 

It is not impossible that all these forms could come back to Arabic munya 'desire'.

 

Valentin Vydrin

 

On Mon, Jan 29, 2018 at 7:00 PM, Bruce Whitehouse <brw208 at lehigh.edu <mailto:brw208 at lehigh.edu> > wrote:

Lors d'un panel sur le mariage pendant la réunion dernière de l'ASA, certains d'entre nous ont remarqué un groupe de termes semblables dans des langues diverses du Sahel occidental. Chaque mot désigne le rôle attendu d'une femme, surtout dans le cadre du mariage, d'être patient et tolérer la souffrance.

Bamanankan: munyu 
Diola: kamuñaku 
Mandinka: munya 
Pulaar: munyal
Wolof: muñ 

Nous nous intéressons à mieux connaître ces termes, les rôles qu'ils désignent et leurs similitudes et différences qui les caractérisent, peut-être lors d'un panel de la réunion prochaine de l'ASA. Nous aimerions mieux comprendre leur distribution géographique (y compris dans d'autres langues que les exemples ci-haut) et leurs origines.

J'invite toute personne qui veut partager ses connaissances sur ce sujet à me joindre par courriel. Un appel à contributions peut suivre sur ce liste selon les réponses qui me parviennent.

*****


At a panel on marriage during the last African Studies Association meeting, a group of scholars noticed a set of similar terms found in various languages spoken in the western Sahel. Each term designates expectations that women should be patient and tolerant of suffering, particularly within the framework of marriage. 

Bamanankan: munyu 
Diola: kamuñaku 
Mandinka: munya 
Pulaar: munyal
Wolof: muñ 

Many participants in that discussion are interested in further exploring these terms, the gendered roles they designate, and the similarities or differences between them--perhaps as a panel at the next African Studies Association meeting. We're curious to know how widely these terms are distributed geographically (including in languages other than the above examples) and what their origins are.

I'd like to invite anyone who's able to share knowledge in this regard to get in touch. Given the responses that come in, I may send a formal call for paper proposals in the days to come. 


Many thanks in advance / merci d'avance,

Bruce Whitehouse

Dept. of Sociology & Anthropology

Lehigh University

 

 

 

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Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

Music Department, SOAS, University of London

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tel +4420 7898 4374 <tel:+44%2020%207898%204374> 

 

see film

"Mali-Cuba: music across generations" (edited and directed by Michele Banal, an AHRC-UK project) 

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=qkZdh1F45C84MZZnyo8O5hMmwLYirdFBai6frTj%2ByVg%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Q3T2jZp0dGkqLFYm8mUlxzCLsLjH3W2pvHya%2B9MeuCo%3D&reserved=0>   

 

music producer of 

'LADILIKAN' - a new album featuring the KRONOS QUARTET & TRIO DA KALI

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636555662320212797&sdata=Zgnv59ZI8daHCp0kYKl15L1LaL6YdhHfYSHHvpL2DfQ%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636528540492500926&sdata=oeZmx1a0GyFwAkcPiRZA9I5Mr1jTJHyl3Amm5WpOraM%3D&reserved=0> 

see their song 'Eh ya ye'
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=1xtQNuN8ZGuHjE%2BK497MI29NYOrPJDfxylYSDUkaPmc%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Ag2%2FRoJzbleKK6wddabDbR5BT%2BYg0jnZSuWu5aVRLkk%3D&reserved=0> 

 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Ag2%2FRoJzbleKK6wddabDbR5BT%2BYg0jnZSuWu5aVRLkk%3D&reserved=0> 


British Academy Newton Advanced Fellowship, 2015-17: 

Afro-Mexican musical youth in Oaxaca: roots, creativity, community

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=k8Sa14ngyoq%2B%2FA%2BTJU94sTp5V4NEtJCeR47TjvFjgu4%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=xIS0Bv5Mh9JURL25udE3%2FP5aB7xOXNcriEin9Jh8pZ4%3D&reserved=0>   

 

 







 




-- 

 



Dr Lucy Durán

Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

Music Department, SOAS, University of London

Thornhaugh Street

London WC1H 0XG

tel +4420 7898 4374 <tel:+44%2020%207898%204374> 

 

see film

"Mali-Cuba: music across generations" (edited and directed by Michele Banal, an AHRC-UK project) 

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=qkZdh1F45C84MZZnyo8O5hMmwLYirdFBai6frTj%2ByVg%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Q3T2jZp0dGkqLFYm8mUlxzCLsLjH3W2pvHya%2B9MeuCo%3D&reserved=0>   

 

music producer of 

'LADILIKAN' - a new album featuring the KRONOS QUARTET & TRIO DA KALI

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636555662320212797&sdata=Zgnv59ZI8daHCp0kYKl15L1LaL6YdhHfYSHHvpL2DfQ%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636528540492500926&sdata=oeZmx1a0GyFwAkcPiRZA9I5Mr1jTJHyl3Amm5WpOraM%3D&reserved=0> 

see their song 'Eh ya ye'
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=1xtQNuN8ZGuHjE%2BK497MI29NYOrPJDfxylYSDUkaPmc%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Ag2%2FRoJzbleKK6wddabDbR5BT%2BYg0jnZSuWu5aVRLkk%3D&reserved=0> 

 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=Ag2%2FRoJzbleKK6wddabDbR5BT%2BYg0jnZSuWu5aVRLkk%3D&reserved=0> 


British Academy Newton Advanced Fellowship, 2015-17: 

Afro-Mexican musical youth in Oaxaca: roots, creativity, community

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=k8Sa14ngyoq%2B%2FA%2BTJU94sTp5V4NEtJCeR47TjvFjgu4%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C851ca6bc6e944cdcc22508d56755c5cc%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636528540492500926&sdata=xIS0Bv5Mh9JURL25udE3%2FP5aB7xOXNcriEin9Jh8pZ4%3D&reserved=0>   

 

 







 


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_______________________________________________
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-- 

Chérif Keita, Ph.D

The William H. Laird Professor of French and the Liberal Arts

Documentary filmmaker

French and Francophone Studies Department

Carleton College,

Northfield, Minnesota 55057

USA

Tel: 507 222 4433 <tel:(507)%20222-4433> (office)

Fax: 507 222 5942 <tel:(507)%20222-5942> 


_______________________________________________
Mansa-l mailing list
Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l

 


_______________________________________________
Mansa-l mailing list
Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l

 

 

 

_______________________________________________
Mansa-l mailing list
Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l

 


_______________________________________________
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Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l

 


_______________________________________________
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_______________________________________________
Mansa-l mailing list
Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l

 

 


_______________________________________________
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Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l




-- 

 



Dr Lucy Durán

Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

Music Department, SOAS, University of London

Thornhaugh Street

London WC1H 0XG

tel +4420 7898 4374

 

see film

"Mali-Cuba: music across generations" (edited and directed by Michele Banal, an AHRC-UK project) 

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=qkZdh1F45C84MZZnyo8O5hMmwLYirdFBai6frTj%2ByVg%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmali-cuba.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=Bg1Z9pvRzcd5kicP8ZBldMcsmFq6DS2LErXmx%2F037Bg%3D&reserved=0>   

 

music producer of 

'LADILIKAN' - a new album featuring the KRONOS QUARTET & TRIO DA KALI

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636555662320212797&sdata=Zgnv59ZI8daHCp0kYKl15L1LaL6YdhHfYSHHvpL2DfQ%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DrNrGmtMscsE&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=7hjwZy%2Bao0wM85HaUqGzOKZKQigkS33VHr%2Fu7rajYV8%3D&reserved=0> 

see their song 'Eh ya ye'
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=1xtQNuN8ZGuHjE%2BK497MI29NYOrPJDfxylYSDUkaPmc%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=JfwfG0f%2FUoL2wjMVB5EgWoI%2B%2Fz%2Bf2YfL8M1yFk5TOzo%3D&reserved=0> 

 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FhxDsn-8eymk&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=JfwfG0f%2FUoL2wjMVB5EgWoI%2B%2Fz%2Bf2YfL8M1yFk5TOzo%3D&reserved=0> 


British Academy Newton Advanced Fellowship, 2015-17: 

Afro-Mexican musical youth in Oaxaca: roots, creativity, community

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7C90149546a8ff449b58a808d580008c6b%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C1%7C636555662320212797&sdata=k8Sa14ngyoq%2B%2FA%2BTJU94sTp5V4NEtJCeR47TjvFjgu4%3D&reserved=0 <https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.somosnegrosdelacosta.org%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cmansa-l%40groups.txstate.edu%7Cfa3d4c4028084d5867e708d56bfedc4f%7Cb19c134a14c94d4caf65c420f94c8cbb%7C0%7C0%7C636533664784737097&sdata=huCHa0xLxB22gX9aTPMgxczp8Ao%2Btp4Z7eG5rsQFh5U%3D&reserved=0>   

 

 







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