[Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"

Lucy Duran ld at soas.ac.uk
Tue Aug 4 06:17:53 CDT 2015


sorry, I meant to say 'the phrase I have heard' - just so you don't think
I'm totally inarticulate!

On 4 August 2015 at 12:17, Lucy Duran <ld at soas.ac.uk> wrote:

> the phrase I have been heard musicians in Bamako use is
>
> 'ka dònkili dila'
> or
> 'ka juru dila'
>
> and, I'm afraid
>
> 'ka dònkili composé'
>
> I'd be interested to know if anyone knows of any other phrases for
> 'composing' a piece of music!
>
> Lucy
>
> On 4 August 2015 at 03:50, Charry, Eric <echarry at wesleyan.edu> wrote:
>
>> Seconding Lucy—thanks Graeme for your work in bringing back from
>> obscurity such rich material from Guinea for public consumption. Those
>> Manfila Dabadou videos are classic! What a treasure trove RTG must have.
>>
>> It seems like there are two, possibly related, versions of Jarabi
>> circulating (each staying within national borders), and yes, it would be
>> fascinating to compare texts and melodies. I see a bunch on Spotify (under
>> Diarabi).
>>
>>
>> Cherif, I’ve heard four words (all in Gambian Mandinka) used by musicians
>> for compose (Karim—please forgive my crude transliteration!):
>> bondi (bo+causative—to take out)
>> funtindi (funti+causative—to take out)
>> kuntu (to cut)
>> teyi (to break or cross)
>>
>> Nice to hear from everyone,
>> Eric Charry
>> From: Cherif Keita <ckeita at carleton.edu>
>> Date: Monday, August 3, 2015 at 8:23 PM
>> To: Graeme Counsel <graeme at radioafrica.com.au>
>> Cc: "Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu" <Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu>
>>
>> Subject: Re: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"
>>
>> This is a very enriching exchange.  Thanks for contributing to it. My
>> question is the following: "what expression do Mande artists use for the
>> act of composing a song"? Thank you in advance, Cherif Keita
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Aug 3, 2015, at 7:02 PM, Graeme Counsel <graeme at radioafrica.com.au>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks Lucy for adding clarity, and for pointing out the birthplace of
>> Fanta Sacko, which lends much weight to the topic. Yes, many dance bands
>> took songs from women, folklore, ceremonies, etc, and as to ownership of
>> this material – much of it is part of the intangible heritage of the Mandé,
>> and good luck to those who claim outright ownership of it! One only has to
>> look at numerous commercial releases to see “authorship” credited to many
>> Mandé epics. But, of course, it’s not really authorship of the songs, it’s
>> interpretation (and arrangement), such as Salif’s wonderful version of
>> Janjon with Les Ambassadeurs du Motel all those years ago.
>>
>>
>>
>> There are versions of a song called “Diaraby”, and versions of another
>> “Kankan Diaraby”, and the Ismaila Diabate version from 1960 is the same as
>> the Manfila “Dabadou” Kante from the 1980s, for example. Sometimes,
>> however, it appears the two songs may get intermingled. In 1964 Kebendo
>> Jazz recorded “Diaraby” and “Kankan Diaraby” in the same session, the
>> latter sung by a female vocalist in a minor key. But in both songs the
>> vocal melodies have similarities to the vocal melody of Fanta Sacko’s
>> recording. Kebendo Jazz, from Gueckedou, rivalled only Keletigui’s band
>> during the early 1960s (they should have been a national orchestra!) and
>> many would have heard these recordings on the radio. It may be that “Kankan
>> Diaraby” is a “Kankan version” of Diaraby, a contemporary song. Clearly,
>> more research is needed. Some people I can think that may assist are Sékou
>> Bembeya and his wife Djanka, and Linké Condé.
>>
>>
>>
>> What would be good is to have all the versions from the RTG of “Diaraby”
>> and “Kankan diaraby” available to listen to – but I don’t have the
>> authority to do that yet. Hopefully, when they are available later this
>> year they will contribute a great deal to our knowledge. Certainly, Fanta
>> Sacko’s version is her own, but as to the authorship of Kankan diaraby –
>> who knows.
>>
>>
>>
>> (Just as a note, Balla’s version of Kankan diaraby was released by
>> Syliphone in late 1966 / early 1967 but was recorded probably in 1964).
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>>
>>
>> Graeme
>>
>>
>>
>> ~ ~ ~
>>
>>
>>
>> Dr Graeme Counsel
>>
>>
>>
>> Subject coordinator, Lecturer, Tutor
>> Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, Faculty of VCA and MCM
>>
>> School of Culture and Communication, Faculty of Arts
>>
>> University of Melbourne
>>
>>
>>
>> Secretary, African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific –
>> www.afsaap.org.au
>>
>> Radio Africa – www.radioafrica.com.au
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Lucy Duran [mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk <ld at soas.ac.uk>]
>> *Sent:* Monday, 3 August 2015 9:48 PM
>> *To:* Alain Sissao <alainsis at gmail.com>
>> *Cc:* Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> *Subject:* Re: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"
>>
>>
>>
>> ps I just watched the wonderful Manfila Dabadou's Yarabi - Graeme what
>> amazing work you've done to make all these treasure available to the
>> general public via your excellent website and youtube! - but it is very
>> different from Kankan Diarabi both musically and in the lyrics. So not
>> related at all, despite the title: for starters, it's in a major key while
>> Kankan Diarabi is defiantly minor key!
>>
>> Lucy
>>
>>
>>
>> On 3 August 2015 at 12:03, Lucy Duran <ld at soas.ac.uk> wrote:
>>
>> Dear all
>>
>> I don't wish to get involved in a discussion of what constitutes 'women's
>> songs ' - but I do want to comment on Graeme Counsel's very interesting
>> remarks regarding previous recordings in Guinea of a tune called Diarabi or
>> 'Kankan Diaraby' (various spellings of the term jarabi). (Some of these
>> songs with Jarabi in the title are not related musically to Kankan Diaraby,
>> however, but Balla et ses Balladins version, recorded in 1967 according to
>> Graeme, is clearly the same tune, albeit in cumbia rhythm!)
>>
>> First of all, Fanta Sacko was in fact born and raised in Kankan. Her
>> father was a kora player. She was married in Kita and stayed on there in
>> the 60s and 70s before moving to Bamako. So she would certainly have heard
>> the music of Guinea's dance bands and the type of guitar music that Massa
>> Makan Diabate described as 'jamana kura' on the sleeve notes to her album
>> (Graeme, was this a term used by others?) And yes, she told me (I think
>> it's the only interview she ever did) that she was inspired by the last
>> line of Sory Kandia's song Nina.
>>
>> It's also perfectly possible that she composed the song while still
>> living in Kankan, - maybe with local guitarists - but it was recorded first
>> by dance bands. There is plenty of evidence to show that Gunea's dance
>> bands took songs composed by women (eg Sira Mory's Kanimba, and Sara) and
>> recorded versions before the women were able to record their own versions.
>>
>> There is another issue. What constitutes 'composing' in the minds of
>> Mande artists? By today's standards, even the slightest arrangement of an
>> older song is claimed by musicians as their composition. The number of
>> singers who have 'composed' Kulanjan or Kaira just to name a few is quite
>> astounding. Some poor music lawyer at some point in the future will be
>> bewildered.
>>
>> By these standards, I think it's fair to say that Fanta Sacko's recorded
>> version was her own composition.
>>
>> all best Lucy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On 3 August 2015 at 17:15, Alain Sissao <alainsis at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Djarabi is the Best song of impossible love. Because money brake world
>> and purity of love. French said Amour impossible.
>>
>> Alain Sissao
>>
>>
>>
>> Envoyé de mon iPhone
>>
>>
>> Le 2 août 2015 à 19:09, Karim Traore <ktraore at uga.edu> a écrit :
>>
>> Aw ni su, mansadenw!
>>
>> Herbert, i ni fama!
>>
>>
>>
>> Sherifu, Prof. Vydrin is not alone ! One easy way to betteryour
>> orthography is to consciously separate what you write into WORDS—as you
>> learned in French. Mun kɛra i la becomes mun kɛr’i la
>>
>> Furu n ma not furunma because you have furu (verb) + n (“indirect
>> object”) + ma (postposition)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Here is the song again:
>>
>>
>>
>> Mun kɛr’i la n jarabi mun kɛr’i la
>>
>> I ba le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ n fɛ
>>
>> Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ
>>
>> I tɛri le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ
>>
>> N ba le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ
>>
>> Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ
>>
>> I tɛri le ko, i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ
>>
>> Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ
>>
>> I fa le ko, i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ
>>
>> Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ
>>
>>
>>
>> Of course, if you disagree with my interpretation of the empahatic form
>> nne, then spell it simply “ne”
>>
>>
>>
>> Karim
>>
>>
>>
>> By the way, new systems of windows and Mac do all have the signs needed
>> to write Manding.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ***************************************************************************
>> Karim Traore, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and African
>> Studies
>> The University of Georgia
>>
>> Comparative Literature            African Studies Institute
>> 231 Joe Brown Hall                 319 Holmes-Hunter Building
>> Athens, GA 30602                   Athens, GA 30602
>>
>> Tel:  +1-706-542-8123           Tel: +1-706-542-9865
>> Cell: +1-706-621-1425
>>
>> ***************************************************************************
>>
>> *That's what capital punishment really means;  those that ain't got the
>> capital, get the punishment*.
>> Mumia Abu-Jamal
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Cherif Keita [mailto:ckeita at carleton.edu <ckeita at carleton.edu>]
>> *Sent:* Sunday, August 2, 2015 11:12 AM
>> *To:* Herbert G. Braun <herbert.braun at web.de>
>> *Cc:* Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> *Subject:* Re: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"
>>
>>
>>
>> Here it is, Herbert.
>>
>> Note: I ask Prof. Vydrin to forgive me for being one of those lazy ones
>> who write Bamana n'importe comment. Izvinitié, pajalsta.
>>
>>
>>
>>                                                 DIARABY(A. F. Touré)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Mun kèrila njarabi, mun kerila, ne dun bé élé fè(2 times)
>>
>> I baa le ko, i kana furunma, ko fen tè né fè
>>
>> Né dun bé éla fè.
>>
>> I teri le ko, i kana furunma, ko fen tè ne fè
>>
>> Ne dun bé élé fè
>>
>> I fa le ko, i kana furunma,  ko fen tè né fè
>>
>> Né dun bé éla fè.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> I kana dimi, i kana kasa, i kana hami, nko,  jaraby koson.
>>
>>
>>
>> Mun kerila njarabi,........................
>>
>>
>>
>> Mun kerila ma chérie, ................
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> What happened to you, my love, what happened, you know you are the one I
>> love.
>>
>> Your mother said you should not marry me because I am poor
>>
>> But you are the one I love.
>>
>> Your friend said..........
>>
>> Your father said..............
>>
>> Do not get angry, do not weep, do not worry because of love, I say(2
>> times)
>>
>> What happened to you,  my darling, you know you are the one I love.
>>
>>
>>
>> Chérif Keita
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> *From: *"Herbert G. Braun" <herbert.braun at web.de>
>> *To: *Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> *Sent: *Thursday, July 30, 2015 1:56:13 PM
>> *Subject: *[Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Mansadenw,
>>
>>
>>
>> I am looking for the lyrics of *Diaraby/Jarabi* (in bambara language)
>> sung by Ali Farka Touré on "Talking Timbuktu". I would be grateful for your
>> help. Thanks in advance.
>>
>>
>>
>> With kind regards, Hery
>>
>>
>>
>> Herbert G. Braun
>> Parcusstraße 1
>> 55116 MAINZ (Germany)
>> Phone: ++49-(0)6131-220591
>> E-Mail: herbert.braun at web.de
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Mansa-l mailing list
>> Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
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>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
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>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Dr Lucy Durán
>>
>> Music Department, SOAS, University of London
>>
>> Thornhaugh Street
>>
>> London WC1H 0XG
>>
>> +4420 7898 4374
>>
>>
>>
>> Senior Lecturer in African Music,
>> Undergraduate Admissions Tutor
>>
>> www.growingintomusic.co.uk
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Dr Lucy Durán
>>
>> Music Department, SOAS, University of London
>>
>> Thornhaugh Street
>>
>> London WC1H 0XG
>>
>> +4420 7898 4374
>>
>>
>>
>> Senior Lecturer in African Music,
>> Undergraduate Admissions Tutor
>>
>> www.growingintomusic.co.uk
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Mansa-l mailing list
>> Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Mansa-l mailing list
>> Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
>> https://groups.txstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/mansa-l
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Dr Lucy Durán
> Music Department, SOAS, University of London
> Thornhaugh Street
> London WC1H 0XG
> +4420 7898 4374
>
> Senior Lecturer in African Music,
> Undergraduate Admissions Tutor
>
> www.growingintomusic.co.uk
>
>


-- 
Dr Lucy Durán
Music Department, SOAS, University of London
Thornhaugh Street
London WC1H 0XG
+4420 7898 4374

Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

www.growingintomusic.co.uk
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