[Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"

Graeme Counsel graeme at radioafrica.com.au
Mon Aug 3 19:00:59 CDT 2015


Hi everyone,

 

Thanks Lucy for adding clarity, and for pointing out the birthplace of Fanta Sacko, which lends much weight to the topic. Yes, many dance bands took songs from women, folklore, ceremonies, etc, and as to ownership of this material – much of it is part of the intangible heritage of the Mandé, and good luck to those who claim outright ownership of it! One only has to look at numerous commercial releases to see “authorship” credited to many Mandé epics. But, of course, it’s not really authorship of the songs, it’s interpretation (and arrangement), such as Salif’s wonderful version of Janjon with Les Ambassadeurs du Motel all those years ago. 

 

There are versions of a song called “Diaraby”, and versions of another “Kankan Diaraby”, and the Ismaila Diabate version from 1960 is the same as the Manfila “Dabadou” Kante from the 1980s, for example. Sometimes, however, it appears the two songs may get intermingled. In 1964 Kebendo Jazz recorded “Diaraby” and “Kankan Diaraby” in the same session, the latter sung by a female vocalist in a minor key. But in both songs the vocal melodies have similarities to the vocal melody of Fanta Sacko’s recording. Kebendo Jazz, from Gueckedou, rivalled only Keletigui’s band during the early 1960s (they should have been a national orchestra!) and many would have heard these recordings on the radio. It may be that “Kankan Diaraby” is a “Kankan version” of Diaraby, a contemporary song. Clearly, more research is needed. Some people I can think that may assist are Sékou Bembeya and his wife Djanka, and Linké Condé. 

 

What would be good is to have all the versions from the RTG of “Diaraby” and “Kankan diaraby” available to listen to – but I don’t have the authority to do that yet. Hopefully, when they are available later this year they will contribute a great deal to our knowledge. Certainly, Fanta Sacko’s version is her own, but as to the authorship of Kankan diaraby – who knows.

 

(Just as a note, Balla’s version of Kankan diaraby was released by Syliphone in late 1966 / early 1967 but was recorded probably in 1964).

 

Cheers,

 

Graeme

 

~ ~ ~ 

 

Dr Graeme Counsel

 

Subject coordinator, Lecturer, Tutor
Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, Faculty of VCA and MCM

School of Culture and Communication, Faculty of Arts

University of Melbourne

 

Secretary, African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific – www.afsaap.org.au <http://www.afsaap.org.au/>  



Radio Africa – www.radioafrica.com.au <http://www.radioafrica.com.au/>  

 

From: Lucy Duran [mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk] 
Sent: Monday, 3 August 2015 9:48 PM
To: Alain Sissao <alainsis at gmail.com>
Cc: Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu
Subject: Re: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"

 

ps I just watched the wonderful Manfila Dabadou's Yarabi - Graeme what amazing work you've done to make all these treasure available to the general public via your excellent website and youtube! - but it is very different from Kankan Diarabi both musically and in the lyrics. So not related at all, despite the title: for starters, it's in a major key while Kankan Diarabi is defiantly minor key!

Lucy

 

On 3 August 2015 at 12:03, Lucy Duran <ld at soas.ac.uk <mailto:ld at soas.ac.uk> > wrote:

Dear all

I don't wish to get involved in a discussion of what constitutes 'women's songs ' - but I do want to comment on Graeme Counsel's very interesting remarks regarding previous recordings in Guinea of a tune called Diarabi or 'Kankan Diaraby' (various spellings of the term jarabi). (Some of these songs with Jarabi in the title are not related musically to Kankan Diaraby, however, but Balla et ses Balladins version, recorded in 1967 according to Graeme, is clearly the same tune, albeit in cumbia rhythm!)

First of all, Fanta Sacko was in fact born and raised in Kankan. Her father was a kora player. She was married in Kita and stayed on there in the 60s and 70s before moving to Bamako. So she would certainly have heard the music of Guinea's dance bands and the type of guitar music that Massa Makan Diabate described as 'jamana kura' on the sleeve notes to her album (Graeme, was this a term used by others?) And yes, she told me (I think it's the only interview she ever did) that she was inspired by the last line of Sory Kandia's song Nina. 

It's also perfectly possible that she composed the song while still living in Kankan, - maybe with local guitarists - but it was recorded first by dance bands. There is plenty of evidence to show that Gunea's dance bands took songs composed by women (eg Sira Mory's Kanimba, and Sara) and recorded versions before the women were able to record their own versions.

There is another issue. What constitutes 'composing' in the minds of Mande artists? By today's standards, even the slightest arrangement of an older song is claimed by musicians as their composition. The number of singers who have 'composed' Kulanjan or Kaira just to name a few is quite astounding. Some poor music lawyer at some point in the future will be bewildered. 

By these standards, I think it's fair to say that Fanta Sacko's recorded version was her own composition.

all best Lucy


 

 

On 3 August 2015 at 17:15, Alain Sissao <alainsis at gmail.com <mailto:alainsis at gmail.com> > wrote:

Djarabi is the Best song of impossible love. Because money brake world and purity of love. French said Amour impossible.

Alain Sissao



Envoyé de mon iPhone


Le 2 août 2015 à 19:09, Karim Traore <ktraore at uga.edu <mailto:ktraore at uga.edu> > a écrit :

Aw ni su, mansadenw!

Herbert, i ni fama!

 

Sherifu, Prof. Vydrin is not alone ! One easy way to betteryour orthography is to consciously separate what you write into WORDS—as you learned in French. Mun kɛra i la becomes mun kɛr’i la

Furu n ma not furunma because you have furu (verb) + n (“indirect object”) + ma (postposition)

 

 

Here is the song again:

 

Mun kɛr’i la n jarabi mun kɛr’i la

I ba le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ n fɛ

Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ

I tɛri le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ

N ba le ko i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ

Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ

I tɛri le ko, i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ

Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ

I fa le ko, i kana furu n ma ko fɛn tɛ nne fɛ

Nne dun bɛ ele fɛ

 

Of course, if you disagree with my interpretation of the empahatic form nne, then spell it simply “ne”

 

Karim

 

By the way, new systems of windows and Mac do all have the signs needed to write Manding. 

 

 

***************************************************************************
Karim Traore, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and African Studies
The University of Georgia

Comparative Literature            African Studies Institute
231 Joe Brown Hall                 319 Holmes-Hunter Building          
Athens, GA 30602                   Athens, GA 30602
   
Tel:  +1-706-542-8123 <tel:%2B1-706-542-8123>            Tel: +1-706-542-9865 <tel:%2B1-706-542-9865> 
Cell: +1-706-621-1425 <tel:%2B1-706-621-1425>           
***************************************************************************
That's what capital punishment really means; 
those that ain't got the capital, get the punishment.
Mumia Abu-Jamal

 

From: Cherif Keita [mailto:ckeita at carleton.edu] 
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2015 11:12 AM
To: Herbert G. Braun <herbert.braun at web.de <mailto:herbert.braun at web.de> >
Cc: Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
Subject: Re: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"

 

Here it is, Herbert. 

Note: I ask Prof. Vydrin to forgive me for being one of those lazy ones who write Bamana n'importe comment. Izvinitié, pajalsta.

 

                                                DIARABY(A. F. Touré)

 

 

Mun kèrila njarabi, mun kerila, ne dun bé élé fè(2 times)

I baa le ko, i kana furunma, ko fen tè né fè

Né dun bé éla fè.

I teri le ko, i kana furunma, ko fen tè ne fè

Ne dun bé élé fè

I fa le ko, i kana furunma,  ko fen tè né fè

Né dun bé éla fè.

 

 

 

I kana dimi, i kana kasa, i kana hami, nko,  jaraby koson.

 

Mun kerila njarabi,........................

 

Mun kerila ma chérie, ................

 

 

 

 

 

What happened to you, my love, what happened, you know you are the one I love.

Your mother said you should not marry me because I am poor

But you are the one I love.

Your friend said..........

Your father said..............

Do not get angry, do not weep, do not worry because of love, I say(2 times)

What happened to you,  my darling, you know you are the one I love.

 

Chérif Keita

 


  _____  


From: "Herbert G. Braun" <herbert.braun at web.de <mailto:herbert.braun at web.de> >
To: Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu <mailto:Mansa-l at groups.txstate.edu> 
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2015 1:56:13 PM
Subject: [Mansa-l] Lyrics : "Diaraby/Jarabi"

 

Dear Mansadenw,

 

I am looking for the lyrics of Diaraby/Jarabi (in bambara language) sung by Ali Farka Touré on "Talking Timbuktu". I would be grateful for your help. Thanks in advance.

 

With kind regards, Hery

 

Herbert G. Braun
Parcusstraße 1
55116 MAINZ (Germany)
Phone: ++49-(0)6131-220591 <tel:%2B%2B49-%280%296131-220591> 
E-Mail:  <mailto:herbert.braun at web.de> herbert.braun at web.de


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-- 

Dr Lucy Durán

Music Department, SOAS, University of London

Thornhaugh Street

London WC1H 0XG

+4420 7898 4374 <tel:%2B4420%207898%204374> 

 

Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

www.growingintomusic.co.uk <http://www.growingintomusic.co.uk> 

 




-- 

Dr Lucy Durán

Music Department, SOAS, University of London

Thornhaugh Street

London WC1H 0XG

+4420 7898 4374

 

Senior Lecturer in African Music,
Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

www.growingintomusic.co.uk <http://www.growingintomusic.co.uk> 

 

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