[Mansa-l] Up-Date Memos: Part 1 Pasted

David Conrad basitigi@earthlink.net
Fri, 4 Feb 2005 16:34:17 -0500


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Conference Participants:
Apparently I cannot send attachments on the list-serv, so I'm going to=20=

paste the three divided parts of the memo into three separate messages.=20=

Here's Part 1:


Updated Information and Notes from MANSA President=92s Visit to Conakry=20=

and Kankan December 22-30, 2004

Conference Calendar
18-19 (Saturday-Sunday): Arrival in Conakry and registration at the=20
Novotel (formerly the Grand Hotel de l'Independence).
20-22 (Monday-Wednesday) Conakry: Opening session and panels.
23 (Thursday): Travel to Kankan.
24-25 (Friday-Saturday): Panel sessions, University of Kankan.
26 (Sunday) Kankan: Sightseeing and musical/cultural events.
27 (Monday): Travel back to Conakry.

Preregistration
To avoid the kind of difficulties and confusion we experienced on the=20
first morning of the last Leiden Conference, and to facilitate meeting=20=

our obligation to the hotel, I'm asking that all participants in North=20=

America pre-register, sending their checks to the Secretary-Treasurer.=20=

Please do that as soon as possible, but no later than March 1.

Regarding the pre-registration fees, Jeanne Toungara has made some=20
thoughtful, helpful suggestions, and I want to quote one of her=20
statements regarding our expenses and our relations with the host=20
countries, as she responded to my earlier memo on how some of the costs=20=

would be handled:
=93In fact, now is the time to request a REAL pre-registration fee.  You=20=

need to
cover program printing and duplicating costs.  You might want to send a
printed invitation to government officials for the opening and closing
ceremonies. If the Guinean government is paying our transportation to
Kankan, they should not be expected to do anymore. We should pick up the
costs for coffee breaks and lunches for invited Guinean guests.  We=20
have all
experienced African generosity, especially when it comes to food, and=20
should
not embarrass ourselves by dividing the catering costs.=94

The following fees are based on Jeanne=92s suggestions:
$60.00 Graduate students
$60.00 Individuals making up to $25,000
$80.00 Individuals making up to $50,000
$100.00 Individuals making over $50,000

Keynote Speaker:
In Conakry I had a pleasant visit with Djibril Tamsir Niane whom I had=20=

not seen in several years. I invited him to be our keynote speaker to=20
open the conference on Monday, 20 June, and he expressed pleasure in=20
accepting the honor.

Travel from Conakry to Kankan and Return
When I was in Conakry the Minister of Higher Education=92s schedule made=20=

it impossible for him to meet with me. But after I left, Mohamed Sa=EFdou=20=

N=92Daou had several meetings with the Minister and other officials. The=20=

result was a letter replying to my written request last year for=20
transportation from Conakry to Kankan on 23 June and back to Conakry on=20=

27 June. The minister=92s letter reads as follows:
A
MANSA S/C Professeur David Conrad
Pr=E9sident de MANSA USA
Professeur Conrad

Au nom de Mr le Pr=E9sident de la R=E9publique de Guin=E9e, le G=E9n=E9ral=
=20
Lansana Cont=E9, je vous f=E9licite pour votre travail d=92organisation =
de la=20
6=E8me Conf=E9rence des Etudes du Manden en Guin=E9e, en Juin 2005 et =
vous=20
rassure de notre disponibilit=E9 pour contribuer =E0 votre success.

Notre decision d=92assurer le transport des participants de la=20
Conf=E9rencve de Conakry =E0 Kankan et retour =E0 Conakry a =E9t=E9 =
retenue et=20
sera effectivement appliqu=E9e.

Veuillez agr=E9er, Monsieur le Professeur, l=92expression de mes =
sentiments=20
distingues.

[signed]
Le Ministre
S=E9kou D=E9cazy Camara


General Arrangements:
There are some changes since the report that I published in MANSA=20
Newsletter 54 (Spring 2004) and sent out in an attachment in November,=20=

and this report also contains some new information on hotel=20
registration, overland travel, money exchange, etc.

NOVOTEL CONAKRY
The person I originally met and listed as the one to contact for=20
reservations seems to be on extended leave. The person to contact now=20
is: Oumou Diallo, Assistant Commercial
	dialloounoulk@yahoo.fr
BP 287, Conakry, Guin=E9e
Tel. (224) 41.50.21
Cell (011) 21.76.28
Fax: (224) 41.16.31/41.45.29

When you have booked your flights, if you e-mail your arrival time,=20
date and airline, a driver and van will meet you at the airport and=20
transport you to the hotel.

Everything else I said in last year=92s report remains the same except=20=

for the rate of exchange, which is now more favorable than it was then=20=

(see below). At the end of this up-date I=92ll insert the previously=20
published details about the hotel in Conakry for the benefit of anybody=20=

who still doesn=92t have them.

PLEASE NOTE
Passing on miscellaneous information to people experienced in Africa=20
can be tricky, because experiences vary widely, and sometimes it=92s =
hard=20
to separate the hopefully useful from the potentially superfluous or to=20=

avoid sounding presumptuous. Some people will already know some of the=20=

things I mention as well as I do, but there might be others who will=20
find some particle of useful information somewhere in here. Many Mande=20=

specialists are more familiar with Mali or Gambia than Guinea (Bamako=20
or Banjul vs. Conakry, etc.). At the rural village level it=92s what=20
you=92re familiar with, but there are some distinct differences about=20
Conakry, so I try to point out some of those.

U.S. Dollars and Guinea Francs:
As reported last year, in January 2004 the rate was U.S.$100 =3D 240,000=20=

FG. Nearly a year later at the end of December it was U.S.$100 =3D=20
330,000 FG. It seems likely that changes favoring the dollar could=20
continue. However, there is talk of a seemingly strange government=20
decision to somehow link the Guinean franc to the Nigerian currency,=20
though nobody seems to know when this is expected to happen, or even if=20=

it will for sure. Therefore, at this point one cannot be sure what will=20=

happen between now and June, if anything. I expect to get periodic=20
updates on any new developments.

NOTE: Do not bring traveler=92s checks to Guinea. Bring hundred-dollar=20=

bills that you will exchange on the street in Conakry near either the=20
French embassy or the main post office for the best possible rate=20
(details & directions will be provided). Before leaving for Kankan you=20=

should estimate how much you=92ll want there and do your changing in=20
Conakry. You can exchange in Kankan, but you won=92t get as good a rate.=20=

And remember, you can use a credit card to pay your bill at the Novotel=20=

in Conakry, but that=92s the only place a credit card will be useful to=20=

you.

MUSEUM EXHIBIT: The Mus=E9e National de Guin=E9e is within easy walking=20=

distance of the hotel. The museum is in much better shape now than it=20
was before its present directory, Sory Kaba, took over. At the end of=20
December Kaba was working on an exhibit of artifacts from the=20
Filipowiak archeological work at Niani, the reports of which were=20
published in the 1960s. Though the exhibit was not yet open, Kaba=20
showed it to Mohamed N=92Daou and me, and has promised to keep it open=20=

and available to conference participants.

ON THE STREETS OF CONAKRY:
When walking in the city after sundown, please go in groups of three or=20=

four, minimum. Please apply the same precaution if you visit one of the=20=

major markets during the daytime.
Markets, street scams, hustlers.




--Apple-Mail-11-396638921
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charset=WINDOWS-1252

Conference Participants:

Apparently I cannot send attachments on the list-serv, so I'm going to
paste the three divided parts of the memo into three separate
messages. Here's Part 1:=20


<fontfamily><param>Times</param>

</fontfamily><center><bold><fontfamily><param>Times</param>Updated
Information and Notes from MANSA President=92s Visit to Conakry and
Kankan December 22-30, 2004

</fontfamily></bold></center><fontfamily><param>Times</param>

<bold><underline>Conference Calendar

</underline></bold>18-19 (Saturday-Sunday): Arrival in Conakry and
registration at the Novotel (formerly the Grand Hotel de
l'Independence).

20-22 (Monday-Wednesday) Conakry: Opening session and panels.

23 (Thursday): Travel to Kankan.

24-25 (Friday-Saturday): Panel sessions, University of Kankan.

26 (Sunday) Kankan: Sightseeing and musical/cultural events.

27 (Monday): Travel back to Conakry.=20


<bold><underline>Preregistration

</underline></bold>To avoid the kind of difficulties and confusion we
experienced on the first morning of the last Leiden Conference, and to
facilitate meeting our obligation to the hotel, I'm asking that all
participants in North America pre-register, sending their checks to
the Secretary-Treasurer. Please do that as soon as possible, but no
later than March 1.=20


Regarding the pre-registration fees, Jeanne Toungara has made some
thoughtful, helpful suggestions, and I want to quote one of her
statements regarding our expenses and our relations with the host
countries, as she responded to my earlier memo on how some of the
costs would be handled:

</fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Times New Roman</param>=93In fact, now
is the time to request a REAL pre-registration fee.  You need to

cover program printing and duplicating costs.  You might want to send a

printed invitation to government officials for the opening and closing

ceremonies. If the Guinean government is paying our transportation to

Kankan, they should not be expected to do anymore. We should pick up
the

costs for coffee breaks and lunches for invited Guinean guests.  We
have all

experienced African generosity, especially when it comes to food, and
should

not embarrass ourselves by dividing the catering costs.=94


The following fees are based on Jeanne=92s =
suggestions:</fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Times</param>

</fontfamily><fontfamily><param>Times New Roman</param>$60.00 Graduate
students =20

$60.00 Individuals making up to $25,000=20

$80.00 Individuals making up to $50,000=20

$100.00 Individuals making over $50,000=20


</fontfamily><bold><underline><fontfamily><param>Times</param>Keynote
Speaker:

</fontfamily></underline></bold><fontfamily><param>Times</param>In
Conakry I had a pleasant visit with Djibril Tamsir Niane whom I had
not seen in several years. I invited him to be our keynote speaker to
open the conference on Monday, 20 June, and he expressed pleasure in
accepting the honor. =20


<bold><underline>Travel from Conakry to Kankan and Return

</underline></bold>When I was in Conakry the Minister of Higher
Education=92s schedule made it impossible for him to meet with me. But
after I left, Mohamed Sa=EFdou N=92Daou had several meetings with the
Minister and other officials. The result was a letter replying to my
written request last year for transportation from Conakry to Kankan on
23 June and back to Conakry on 27 June. The minister=92s letter reads as
follows:

A

MANSA S/C Professeur David Conrad

Pr=E9sident de MANSA USA

Professeur Conrad


Au nom de Mr le Pr=E9sident de la R=E9publique de Guin=E9e, le G=E9n=E9ral=

Lansana Cont=E9, je vous f=E9licite pour votre travail d=92organisation =
de
la 6=E8me Conf=E9rence des Etudes du Manden en Guin=E9e, en Juin 2005 et
vous rassure de notre disponibilit=E9 pour contribuer =E0 votre success.


Notre decision d=92assurer le transport des participants de la
Conf=E9rencve de Conakry =E0 Kankan et retour =E0 Conakry a =E9t=E9 =
retenue et
sera effectivement appliqu=E9e.


Veuillez agr=E9er, Monsieur le Professeur, l=92expression de mes
sentiments distingues.


</fontfamily><flushright><fontfamily><param>Times</param>[signed]

Le Ministre

S=E9kou D=E9cazy Camara

</fontfamily></flushright><fontfamily><param>Times</param>


<bold><underline>General Arrangements:

</underline></bold>There are some changes since the report that I
published in <italic>MANSA Newsletter</italic> 54 (Spring 2004) and
sent out in an attachment in November, and this report also contains
some new information on hotel registration, overland travel, money
exchange, etc.


<bold>NOVOTEL CONAKRY

</bold>The person I originally met and listed as the one to contact
for reservations seems to be on extended leave. The person to contact
now is: Oumou Diallo, <italic>Assistant Commercial</italic>

	=
<underline><color><param>0000,0000,FFFF</param>dialloounoulk@yahoo.fr</col=
or></underline>

BP 287, Conakry, Guin=E9e

Tel. (224) 41.50.21

Cell (011) 21.76.28

Fax: (224) 41.16.31/41.45.29


When you have booked your flights, if you e-mail your arrival time,
date and airline, a driver and van will meet you at the airport and
transport you to the hotel.=20


Everything else I said in last year=92s report remains the same except
for the rate of exchange, which is now more favorable than it was then
(see below). At the end of this up-date I=92ll insert the previously
published details about the hotel in Conakry for the benefit of
anybody who still doesn=92t have them.


PLEASE NOTE

Passing on miscellaneous information to people experienced in Africa
can be tricky, because experiences vary widely, and sometimes it=92s
hard to separate the hopefully useful from the potentially superfluous
or to avoid sounding presumptuous. Some people will already know some
of the things I mention as well as I do, but there might be others who
will find some particle of useful information somewhere in here. Many
Mande specialists are more familiar with Mali or Gambia than Guinea
(Bamako or Banjul vs. Conakry, etc.). At the rural village level it=92s
what you=92re familiar with, but there are some distinct differences
about Conakry, so I try to point out some of those.<bold>

</bold>

<bold>U.S. Dollars and Guinea Francs:

</bold>As reported last year, in January 2004 the rate was U.S.$100 =3D
240,000 FG. Nearly a year later at the end of December it was U.S.$100
=3D 330,000 FG. It seems likely that changes favoring the dollar could
continue. However, there is talk of a seemingly strange government
decision to somehow link the Guinean franc to the Nigerian currency,
though nobody seems to know when this is expected to happen, or even
if it will for sure. Therefore, at this point one cannot be sure what
will happen between now and June, if anything. I expect to get
periodic updates on any new developments.


NOTE: <underline>Do not bring traveler=92s checks to Guinea</underline>.
Bring hundred-dollar bills that you will exchange on the street in
Conakry near either the French embassy or the main post office for the
best possible rate (details & directions will be provided). Before
leaving for Kankan you should estimate how much you=92ll want there and
do your changing in Conakry. You can exchange in Kankan, but you won=92t
get as good a rate. And remember, you can use a credit card to pay
your bill at the Novotel in Conakry, but that=92s the only place a
credit card will be useful to you.<bold>


</bold>MUSEUM EXHIBIT: The Mus=E9e National de Guin=E9e is within easy
walking distance of the hotel. The museum is in much better shape now
than it was before its present directory, Sory Kaba, took over. At the
end of December Kaba was working on an exhibit of artifacts from the
Filipowiak archeological work at Niani, the reports of which were
published in the 1960s. Though the exhibit was not yet open, Kaba
showed it to Mohamed N=92Daou and me, and has promised to keep it open
and available to conference participants.


ON THE STREETS OF CONAKRY:=20

When walking in the city after sundown, please go in groups of three
or four, minimum. Please apply the same precaution if you visit one of
the major markets during the daytime.

Markets, street scams, hustlers.


=20


</fontfamily>=

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